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The wealthiest and poorest places in the UK

Posted in 'Neighbourhood' by Barry Stamp

24 July 2013

The rights and wrongs of postcode profiling were featured on Monday morning this week on Radio 4 in the second and final instalment of its feature called Postcode Profiling – Winners and Losers.

Presenter Aasmah Mir visited the most wealthy, and poorest places in the UK, according to the geodemographic postcode profiling system, ACORN (A Classification of Residential Neighbourhoods). Respectively, these were the chocolate box village of Cholesbury, in the Chilterns, and the town of Queensway, near Wrexham, reported as the largest council estate in Wales.

Interviewing residents of each place, none was surprised by the classification, though some were surprised at being at the extreme ends of the scale. And despite being categorised as being either the wealthiest, or the most deprived, everyone seemed happy enough.

You can see for yourself how these two places are rated on two other geodemographic postcode profiling databases on checkmyfile –or indeed how your own home area is rated, together with other data collected about the neighbourhood. For example, in Cholesbury the most expensive properties fetch up to £672,000 on average, which contrasts remarkably with those in Queensway, averaging at less than £90,000.

Barry Stamp is a co-founder of checkmyfile and is a Chartered Banker and a Fellow of the Institute of Credit Management. He can be contacted at barry.stamp@checkmyfile.com.

Barry Stamp

Barry is a Chartered Banker and a Fellow of the Institute of Credit Management. He has a degree in Statistics and Business Economics from the Open University. Barry writes mostly on news from the worlds of banking and mortgages.

Barry is a co-founder of checkmyfile.

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