What is the...

Registry Trust

Registry Trust is the official registrar for the Register of Judgments, Orders and Fines, and is responsible for providing court judgment information to the Credit Reference Agencies.

Does Registry Trust information appear on my Credit Report?

Registry Trust supplies the four Credit Reference Agencies – Equifax, Experian, TransUnion, and Crediva – with its public records: this is how any CCJs in your details can end up on your Credit Report. Any CCJs on your Credit Report can drastically harm your chances of a successful credit application, so it’s worth knowing what information is held about you before applying for finance.

You can check your court records, alongside your complete Credit Report, by using checkmyfile. Our Multi Agency Credit Report is the most detailed in the UK, gathering all of your information from Equifax, Experian, TransUnion, and Crediva, ensuring you see everything that a prospective lender will see.

You can try checkmyfile free for 30 days, and then just £14.99 per month, which you can easily cancel online at any time.

The information held by the Registry Trust is supplied by the relevant courts. The data includes County Court Judgments (CCJs) and High Court Judgments (HCJs) from courts in England and Wales, Scottish sheriff court decrees, and judgments from Northern Ireland, Jersey, and Isle of Man.

Who does Registry Trust share information with?

Registry Trust passes public court records, such as CCJs and HCJs, to a range of organisations. Most notable are the Credit Reference Agencies: the bodies that compile your Credit Reports. Any court records on your Credit Report will damage your creditworthiness, making it harder and more expensive to take out credit.

Additionally, Registry Trust shares information with government bodies, charities, and regulators to support consumers.

Finally, individuals can access Registry Trust’s database themselves to check their own court records.

How often are my Court Records updated?

In order for your Court Records to be updated on your Credit Report, the relevant courts will need to share their new information with Registry Trust, who in turn shares the data with the Credit Reference Agencies. This process often takes up to one calendar month to be fully completed, so it’s likely that any changes to your Court Records will be reflected on your Credit Report after one month.

The UK's First Provider Of Online Credit Reports

Launched 21 Years, 35 Million Credit Scores & 8 Million Credit Reports Ago

The UK's First Provider Of Online Credit Reports

Related Jargon