Base Rate

What is a Base Rate?

A Base Rate is published by banks such as Barclays, NatWest and Lloyds TSB to price loans, overdrafts and other forms of credit.

The Base Rate for each individual bank is not technically linked to the Bank of England Base Rate (which is the rate at which the Bank of England lends to the banks, or at which the banks tend to lend to each other), but movement in the BoE Base Rate invariably affects all others.

Banks will regularly adjust the credit products they offer in order to maximise profit, for example consumers may be offered a loan at 7% over a bank’s base rate, while a medium size company might pay between 1-3% over and a large, blue chip company might be charged 0.5% over.

Savings rates are often below a bank’s base rates and borrowing rates will be above that rate. The difference (the ‘margin') is where banks make their profit.


Q: What influences base rate changes?

A: A number of external factors contribute towards a change in the base rate, but the rate of inflation is a leading cause.

Q: How does a change to the Base Rate affect me?

A: If you have a Tracker Mortgage, the amount of interest you pay on your loan will be directly affected in-line with any changes to the base rate. That means if the rate increases, the cost will go up, if it decreases, the cost will go down.

If you have a savings account, the amount you earn in interest will be affected similarly by the base rate.

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