Adjudication

What is Adjudication?

In a credit context, Adjudication usually refers to the decision of a judge to bankrupt someone based on the facts presented to them, and concluding that the person cannot continue to pay their debts as they fall due.

Adjudication is also a term used when issuing a County Court Judgment, High Court Judgment or Scottish Decree. In effect, it means 'the decision of the Court.'

Upon adjudication, the information will be subsequently reported via Registry Trust to the credit reference agencies, ensuring that it is displayed on your credit report.

In wider legal parlance, adjudication is the pronouncement of a judge of a decision in Court.

In Scotland, the legal process of Adjudication for Debt is long-established, first enacted in 1672. It allows someone who is owed money to go to court and obtain a Scottish Decree to take Security over a property, usually land. Unless the debt is repaid, the person owed money can obtain ownership after 10 years. In 2007 it was decided to abolish Adjudication – sometimes called Adjudication in Debt – and a replacement law remains to be put into place.

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